business signs, new york signs, Signs NYC, Sign maker , nyc signs , signs new york , brooklyn signs, Sign company, Awnings,
Sign company, Awnings,brooklyn signs, new york signs, Signs NYC, Sign maker, business signs

T.G.I. Fridays, Times Square NYC

Installed this LED board sign in Times Square, NYC.  Manufactured by our friends at WatchFire Signs. 

Cheyenne Diner Removal

Paul Signs Inc. had the honor of removing the signs from the famous Cheyenne Diner in Hell's Kitchen, NYC.  The historic, 24-hour diner closed it's doors in 2008.  Our removal of the signs was not long after.  The diner itself has since been moved to Alabama by it's new owners.  

Return Of the Wonder Wheel Sign - 2014

 

The return of the Wonder Wheel sign in Coney Island, NY. After repairing the worn out electronics and giving the sign some fresh paint after removing any rust and salt water damage sustained during the Hurricane Sandy storm, the sign was put back home.

Wonder Wheel Removal - 2014

Paul Signs Inc. removal of the iconic Wonder Wheel sign in Coney Island in May of 2014. The sign needed some repairs after superstorm hurricane Sandy damaged most of New York and it's beach communities.  There was salt water damage and wear and tear of time showing on the famous sign. It has been 14 years since we last refurbished the sign.

We are refurbishing the vintage sign and will be back in its place before the summer season.

Emergency Sign Removal - Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Paul Signs Inc. received a call around 5:30 on a rainy and windy Thursday.  A local business in Fort Greene, had their vintage 800 pound sign hanging by one of the two supports.  The sign was mounted right above the entrance, so it was a dangerous situation.  Within 20 minutes, we arrived on site, welcomed by both FDNY trucks and NYPD vehicles.  They had cautioned off the area, and were relieved when we showed up.  

We brought a heavy duty crane to do the actual removal, but in order to get the sign in a safe position, we also brought a service truck for support.  The support truck helped guide the sign down, after attaching the lifting straps to the sign.  

The sign is thought to be from the 1940's, from the porcelain enamel faces and neon fixtures. The internal structure, the skeleton, was rusted and the reason it fell was due to the heavy rusting.  The brackets used to hang the sign was an outdated design, along with the age with rust and swaying in the wind, the bracket wore away to a thin metal piece that just snapped. The vintage sign is awaiting a refurbish in order to clear it for permits and make it safe for years to come.